Bristol Harbourside in the 1990s

Back when I was teaching at a college in Bristol, I use to undertake regular field trips to the Bristol Harbourside as part of a unit on urban regeneration. There was at the time to much happening down there after years of inaction that it was an ideal place to demonstrate the impact of investment and change of use. Bristol had been an important port for hundreds of years, this all came to a halt in the 1970s and regeneration plans were developed. Not much happened for twenty years, but in the last twenty years we have seen major regeneration of the area, massive building of offices, business, residential and entertainment, as well as visitor attractions such as at-Bristol (where incidentally I worked for a while when it opened).

During one of those field trips, I took my SLR camera with me, and digging around a box in the garage I found the prints, which I have since scanned in.

Bristol Harbourside

They show a different harbourside to what you can see today, but also different to how the working docks were in the 1950s and 1960s. Above you can see the Watershed, which is still around. Here is another view of the Watershed, it hasn’t changed, but the bars and cafés underneath do seem to swap and change on a regular basis.

Watershed

This view hasn’t changed much in the last twenty years.

Bristol Harbourside

Whereas on the other side, we can see major construction work underway, on what is now Za Za Bazaar, but has been many different establishments over the years.

Construction in the Bristol Harbourside

At this time, there was no Pero’s Bridge either, so it was always a long walk from the LloydsTSB building amphitheatre to the Arnolfini round by the top of the harbourside. Another view, a bit further down the water.

Bristol Harbourside

Looking back over the photographs (and I may post more in a later blog post) shows how things have changed over the last twenty years (has it really been that long) and how somethings change and something remain the same.

Fountains Abbey

I have been to Fountains Abbey in North Yorkshire, once in 1979 on a school trip and then again in the 1990s when I was visiting York. These photographs are from that visit in the 1990s.

Fountains Abbey

This National Trust property is ruined, was burnt down by Henry VIII following his arguments with Rome over divorce.

Fountains Abbey

Though I was at the University of York in the late 1980s, I never actually got around to visiting again, in the main as when I was at University I didn’t have a car, and public transport wasn’t always an option.

Fountains Abbey

I keep meaning to visit again, we went to York at Easter 2013, but the cold weather at the time (it snowed a lot) meant that we kept to indoor attractions such as the Castle Museum and the National Railway Museum.

Fountains Abbey

Fountains Abbey

If you are a member of the National Trust, and though I went a long time ago now, I would recommend a visit.

Grease Lightning…

Grease Lightning…

The photograph is from the 1988 production of Grease at the University of York, the car nearly did drive off the stage…

It was a nightmare getting the car, a fantastic red Triumph Herald,  on stage, as tit had to be manhandled up the stairs to the first floor where the stage was. The engine luckily had been removed.

On the first night during the Grease Lightning song, the car was pushed from the back of the stage to the front, at which point the bloke driving the car couldn’t see the edge of the stage and nearly “drove” into the orchestra pit! I don’t think the audience noted, but you could tell the orchestra did, as the music went off key ever so slightly, as some of the musicians got scared of getting crushed!

I wasn’t in the production, something to do with the fact I couldn’t sing or act… however I was part of the team that sold tickets and managed the event on the days the musical was staged, so I got to see it every night it was on.

Nearly thirty years later, your mind will recall things slightly differently to the way that it happened, my memory recalls the performance as been very professional and really good. Great music, wonderful singing and a memorable performance.

Sadly I have no memory for names, so couldn’t tell you who is in the picture.

Royal Air Force Museum Cosford

The Royal Air Force Museum Cosford, located in Cosford in Shropshire, is a museum dedicated to the history of aviation and the Royal Air Force in particular. On a recent trip up north for a holiday, we stopped off for a few hours to have a look around the museum. It is free to get in, and certainly a much nicer option over stopping at the motorway services!

There are lots of aircraft on display, and the Cold War exhibition certainly was quite haunting (especially for those of us who the 1980s isn’t history, as we lived through it).

RAF Cosford

Spitfire

Catalina

Me163 Komet

RAF Cosford

RAF Cosford

RAF Cosford

RAF Cosford

RAF Cosford

RAF Cosford

Well worth a visit if you like aircraft or modern history.

The Doors in a Ford Training Film

The Doors provided instrumental backing to a training film for Ford, before recording their first album. Recorded in 1966 and not previously released.

Rather than watch the whole film, just watch the end credits to hear some classic sounds from the Doors (and see their name in the credits).

You can watch the whole film, but remember this was made in 1966 and though focussed on customer service, is rather sexist.